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US Capitol Police Arrest Democrat Who Doxxed GOP Senators During Kav Hearing, He Worked For FEINSTEIN

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Chicks on the right are now confirming that capital authorities have arrested a former intern for publically releasing personal information belonging to three prominent Republican senators during a heated confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

27-year-old Jackson Cosko was caught after a former co-worker found him using a computer in the Senate offices of Maggie Hassan, where he recently worked as a “legislative correspondent/systems administrator,” but no longer had clearance to use. Cosko was confronted by the co-worker and then he left Hassan’s office.

The staffer then e-mailed the person who had caught him and threatened to release even more information, including information about lawmakers’ children, if they ratted him out. “If you tell anyone I will leak it all. Emails, signal conversations, gmails. Senators’ children’s health information and socials.”

Luckily, the threat did not deter the person from calling the police and they arrested Cosko. Shortly thereafter authorities confirmed that the staffer, Cosko, was not supposed to have access to Hassan’s office and that he used another person’s log-in information to use the computer.

If convicted, Cosko faces five federal charges of making public restricted personal information. Along with making threats in interstate commerce, unauthorized access of a government computer, identity theft, and obstruction of justice/witness tampering.

He was also charged with second-degree burglary and unlawful entry in Washington, D.C. He could face up to 20 years in prison if convicted on the charges. Lock him up!

Here is more on doxxing via The Conversation:

“Imagine this: there’s a knock at your door. “Pizza delivery!” It’s the fifth time in the last hour that you’ve had to say to a delivery-person: “No, I really didn’t order anything.” That’s irritating.

“Half an hour later, there’s another noise at the door. This time it’s forced open as your house is stormed by the heavily armed and aggressive special response unit of your local police force. They’re responding to a tip-off that warned them of a hostage situation at your address. That’s not just irritating. That’s dangerous.

“Why is all this happening? Turns out, you’ve come to the attention of a cluster of mischief makers and misanthropes in one of the internet’s dank corners.

“You’ve been “doxxed”. Your private information has been posted, perhaps by an anonymous imageboard user, who’s implored others to “do with it as you will”.

“This might sound far-fetched, but these sorts of internet-enabled attacks have become more frequent in recent years. In fact, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been cautioning citizens about “swatting” (see below) since 2008.

“It has become common to see articles about how these attacks have affected politicians (both Republican and Democrat in the US), celebrities, journalists, businesses, video game streamers, and public servants.

“What is doxxing?

“Doxxing – named for “documents” or “docs” – is the act of release of someone’s personal and/or identifiable information without their consent. This can include things like their full legal name, social security numbers, home or work addresses and contact information.

“There’s no set format for a “dox”; the doxxer simply publishes whatever information they’ve managed to turn up in their searches. Sometimes this even includes the names and details of their target’s family or close friends.

“As a tactic of harassment, doxxing serves two purposes: it intimidates the people targeted by invading and disrupting their expectations of privacy; and it provides an avenue for the perpetuation of that person’s harassment by distributing information as a resource for future harassers to use.

“Technology and security expert Bruce Schneier argues that 2015 will see even more doxxings, as “everyone from political activists to hackers to government leaders has now learned how effective this attack is”.

“What is swatting?

“Swatting – named for the US police Special Weapons And Tactics (SWAT) teams – is the act of making a false report to the police with the intention of having a heavily armed response team sent to the target’s home.

“This is made even more problematic by the militarisation that local US police forces have undergone in the last decade through initiatives like the Department of Defense’s 1033 program, which allows the pentagon to provide military grade weapons and equipment to local police forces on a free, permanent loan.

“Technology journalist Sarah Jeong describes this as “assault by proxy”, as the police can cause serious injury to the targets of these swatting attacks.

“How do these attacks happen?

“Unfortunately, the technical barrier to doxxing or swatting a person is low. A doxxer can acquire information on their target through a variety of legitimate public sources. Or, more nefariously, through social engineering techniques.

“Swatting often just requires the name, phone number and address of the intended target. Swatters often use cheap or freely available anonymizing technology to disguise their identity, or to “spoof” the phone number of their target, when making their false report — a move that makes their crime difficult to police.

“These attempts also prey on the good faith basis with which emergency responders treat their callers, and as a result valuable police time and resources are diverted away when they may be needed elsewhere.

“How can you protect yourself?

“If you find yourself at the receiving and of these forms of intimidation and abuse, you’ve likely done nothing wrong. People are doxxed and swatted for all sorts of imagined wrongs, as banal as having an opinion on the internet or playing video games.

“Unfortunately, the prevalence of doxxing and swatting is, in part, born of a perfect storm in personal data insecurity and easily-abused systems for reporting crime. There are no perfect solutions for avoiding being doxxed or swatted except making yourself a more difficult target by adopting strong information security practices.

“While the simplest solution for online security is not having online data, this is impractical in the digital age because major parts of our social and professional lives are intermediated through web services. That said, there are a few precautions you can take to increase the security of your data online.

“Google yourself

“One of the first steps in securing your personal details is discovering to what extent they’re already out there and publicly available. If you find old accounts or websites you no longer want, sites like justdelete.me can provide information about having your account deleted from certain websites.

“Don’t re-use passwords for multiple services

“This can be difficult, as a new password for every service you use will be taxing to even the best of memories. The best, most complex passwords will be challenging to guess or to brute-force, but also difficult to remember.

“Here’s where technology can make life easier; a password manager app, like LastPass, KeePass or 1Password can help you set unique, complex passwords for each service you use, and let you secure them behind a single, more memorable password.

“Though password managers come with their own risks, I’d argue that the benefits of using complex passwords can outweigh these.

“Turn on two-factor authentication

“Two-factor authentication requires that people trying to access your account have access to a password as well as a “trusted device” – typically your mobile phone – in order to receive an authentication code before gaining access to your account. The Two Factor Auth website lists popular web services and their support (or lack of support) for two-factor authentication.

“You can find more information in advice from people who’ve experienced these attacks, and at websites like Crash Override Network, a support network for the targets of online abuse that provides some excellent guides on online security, and how to cope with doxxing and swatting attacks.”

Who wants to bet there is more to this story? Does anyone actually believe the narrative that a simple IT staffer did this all on his own? Why would he? Whatever happened here we can rest assured that once the FBI gets done with him he will be singing like a canary and naming names.

 

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Texas CBP Seizes $6 Million Worth Of Meth In Tractor-Trailer

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This story originally appeared on WeBuildTheWall.news & was republished with permission:

Here is yet another important reminder of why we need the wall!

Earlier this month, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Pharr, Texas, seized more than $6 million worth of methamphetamine concealed in a shipment of fresh honeydew melons.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection released a report:

PHARR, Texas—U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Field Operations (OFO) at the Pharr International Bridge cargo facility seized $6,085,000 worth of methamphetamine that was concealed within a commercial shipment of fresh melons.

“This was a great interception of hard narcotics that our officers accomplished this past weekend in another commercial shipment arriving from Mexico,” said Port Director Sylvia Briones, Hidalgo/Pharr/Anzalduas Port of Entry. “This demonstrates CBP Field Operations’ continued steadfast commitment in the fight against drugs.”

On April 12, CBP officers assigned to the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge cargo facility referred a commercial shipment of honeydew melons for further inspection. Utilizing non-intrusive imaging technology (NII) along with all available tools and resources, officers discovered 304 pounds (138 kg) of alleged methamphetamine concealed within the trailer. CBP OFO stored the narcotics in 12 plastic buckets due to it being introduced in bulk form.

CBP OFO seized the narcotics, the tractor/trailer and the case remains under investigation by Homeland Security Investigation (HSI) agents.

Breitbart has more on this story:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized 425 pounds of methamphetamine with an estimated street value of $8.5 million during three separate seizures at the Texas border over the weekend and into Monday.

The first seizure occurred on April 12 when CBP officers assigned to the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge cargo facility contacted a driver for a commercial shipment of honeydew melons. Officers later found 304 pounds of methamphetamine concealed within the trailer. CBP seized the shipment and referred the driver to investigators of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). The street value of the methamphetamine seized was estimated at $6,085,000, according to a media release.

The second seizure occurred on April 14 when officers assigned to the Hidalgo International Bridge contacted a 25-year-old male Mexican citizen from Reynosa, Tamaulipas. During secondary inspection, a CBP K-9 led to the discovery of 40 packages concealed within the vehicle, containing 51 pounds of methamphetamine with an estimated street value of $1 million. The drugs and vehicle were seized, and the male driver turned over to the custody of HSI investigators. Continue Reading

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CBP Officers Intercept Meth Worth Over $1.4 Million At Laredo Port Of Entry

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection just intercepted meth worth over $1.4 million at the Laredo Port of Entry. That’s staggering. Office of Field Operations (OFO) officers intercepted a monstrous amount of lethal narcotics with an estimated street value of more than $1.4 million in one enforcement action at the Gateway to the Americas International Bridge. That amount of meth would have signed the death warrants for a lot of Americans.

“Our CBP officers’ knowledge of concealment methods and the technology they utilize on a daily basis played a key role in the discovery,” said Port Director Albert Flores, Laredo Port of Entry. “CBP officers display exemplary vigilance in keeping dangerous narcotics from entering our country.” Well, I guess so… that’s a massive haul.

The seizure happened on April 15th… Tax Day. How ironic. A CBP officer referred a 2001 Jeep Cherokee driven by a 35-year-old male Mexican citizen who resides in Nuevo Laredo for a secondary examination at the Gateway to the Americas International Bridge. After a thorough canine and non-intrusive imaging inspection, CBP officers discovered 63 packages containing a total of 70 pounds of alleged methamphetamine within the vehicle.

Street value for these deadly narcotics is $1,410,944. The officers seized the drugs and the vehicle. The driver was arrested and the case was turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement-Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) special agents for further investigation. Looks like he’s going away forever.

Some drug cartel is going to be very ticked over this development. That makes me all warm and fuzzy inside. And that wasn’t the only drug seizure recently in Texas along the border. There were three huge ones.

From Breitbart:

“U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized 425 pounds of methamphetamine with an estimated street value of $8.5 million during three separate seizures at the Texas border over the weekend and into Monday.

“The first seizure occurred on April 12 when CBP officers assigned to the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge cargo facility contacted a driver for a commercial shipment of honeydew melons. Officers later found 304 pounds of methamphetamine concealed within the trailer. CBP seized the shipment and referred the driver to investigators of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). The street value of the methamphetamine seized was estimated at $6,085,000, according to a media release.

“The second seizure occurred on April 14 when officers assigned to the Hidalgo International Bridge contacted a 25-year-old male Mexican citizen from Reynosa, Tamaulipas. During secondary inspection, a CBP K-9 led to the discovery of 40 packages concealed within the vehicle, containing 51 pounds of methamphetamine with an estimated street value of $1 million. The drugs and vehicle were seized, and the male driver turned over to the custody of HSI investigators.

“The final seizure occurred on April 15 when CBP officers working the Gateway to the Americas International Bridge in Laredo, Texas, contacted a 35-year old male driver from Nuevo Laredo, driving a 2001 Jeep Cherokee. The driver was referred for a secondary inspection where a K-9 alerted to 63 packages of methamphetamine weighing 70 pounds with an estimated street value of $1,410,944.”

According to the Democrats, there’s no emergency here. These drugs lead directly to the deaths and misery of thousands of Americans. I consider it a clear and present danger to national security. We must get the wall built and soon one way or the other. #WeBuildTheWall

This story originally appeared on WeBuildTheWall.news & was edited & republished with permission:

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